Fast charging is a must have feature in today’s phones. It keeps our batteries topped up through busy days. However, there are a variety of different standards from different companies. Some only work with specific cables and chargers, while others use higher voltages. It can all get a bit confusing, so we’re here to make sense of it. In a nutshell, fast charging increases the current sent to the battery to fill up its capacity quicker. The basic USB specification only sends 0.5 amps (A) of current using 5 volts (V) for just 2.5 watts (W). Fast charging technologies boost these figures. Huawei’s 10V/4A SuperCharge produces 40W and Samsung’s latest Adaptive Fast Charging produces 15W of juice. Some Chinese companies even boast charging technologies that can hit up to 100W. All fast charging services share a common theme — more power. That’s just the basic overview. How a battery actually charges up is more complicated. Before we get to that, let’s look at the differences between all of these fast charging standards in more detail. USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) is the official fast charging specification published by the USB-IF back in 2012. The standard can be used by any device w...