Billie Eilish Sang by The Sand at Chanel’s Pop-Up Yacht Club on Shelter Island

A few days before setting sail for Shelter Island, Billie Eilish had an accident. “I fell down some stairs, you know,” she said with a laugh on the red carpet at Chanel’s pop-up yacht club at Sunset Beach on Saturday night, which included transport to the party by Riva yachts, Chanel-branded surfboards, beach umbrellas, badminton sets and board games, as well as a Chanel J12 watch shop inside Sunset Beach Hotel. “We wrapped my foot in a Chanel scarf,” she added, pointing down to her clunky medical boot and the purple interlocking C logos printed beneath the black velcro and plastic. Injury and all, Eilish was proud to represent the French fashion house that has believed in her from the very beginning of her career. This event and performance, which was a celebration of Chanel’s relaunched J12 watch that comes in four styles and has a new 12.1 caliber automatic movement, was Eilish’s second for the label. She’d previously performed at the Coco Club Party at the Wing back in 2017 when she was a 15-year-old pop star on the rise. This time, even on a small island adjacent to the Hamptons, a sizable line of kids awaited her arrival anxiously outside of Sunset Beach, eager to get a sn...

Squeeze It Like an Orange: Passionate Painter Huguette Caland Shines at Tate St. Ives -ARTnews

Huguette Caland’s painting series Bribes de Corps (Body Parts) could very well be an expression of orgasmic pleasure. The canvases painted in the early 1970s are filled with bright, sunny bursts of vibrating color. Organic forms—abstract and elemental—evoke feminine curves, slits, and points of embrace. Created in the run-up to the Lebanese civil war as the Beirut-born but relocated artist found her voice in Paris, the works reflect Caland’s essence as a free, fun-loving woman detaching herself from the burdens of patriarchal tradition and the conventions of genre. While hints of the Mediterranean Sea remained, Caland liberated her paintings from a sense of place and opted instead to search deep inside her own soul and desires. “Art is not a part of my life; it is my whole life,” Caland told her friend, the writer Helen Khal, for her 1987 survey book The Woman Artist in Lebanon. “I’ve never analyzed my creative intention. I know only that I want to determine a point of emotion in the painting or drawing, and that I am absorbed by an exploration of the sensual possibilities of the human body.” Now at the age of 88, after moving from Beirut to Paris and California and eventually b...