“We’re finding a lot of farmers calling us, saying they don’t have enough money to pay rent,” says a Cedar Rapids bankruptcy attorney. This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Roger Zylstra harvest soybeans on his farm near Kellogg, Iowa, in 2017, working into the night to catch up after a wet week. Rodney White and Michael Zamora/The Register Dozens of Iowa farmers may be unable to get operating loans to buy seed, pay rent or make tractor payments this year, a sign of the growing cracks in the state’s ag economy. Nearly 3 percent of Iowa farm borrowers will be unable to get renewed financing, the Chicago Federal Reserve said in February, based on a survey of lenders. “We have a percentage of farmers who are at the end of their credit ropes,” said Chad Hart, an Iowa State University agricultural economist. Farm bankruptcies remain relatively low in Iowa, but some financial data is raising concerns among economists:  Higher-than-expected yields for some areas of Iowa last fall — and government payments to offset losses blamed on trade wars with China, Mexico a...