Sturgeon are one of the more imperiled fish species in the world. Beloved of anglers, caviar fans, and Indigenous groups who have had a long relationship with this big prehistoric-looking fish, sturgeon have a confounding life history. We don’t know a lot about them, whether they’re swimming in Russian or Canadian waters. Writer Laura Trethewey gives readers a glimpse into the life of this enigmatic species in her new book The Imperiled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea, and that glimpse is lovely. The book ranges across ocean issues. Trethewey shares a depth and breadth of ocean stories, from refugees risking their lives to flee horrific circumstances to the cruelty experienced by cruise ship laborers to the labor of filming underwater scenes. Alternating between grim and hopeful, the author ultimately believes we can all create a healthier ocean, whether we work with fish, refugees, or bring the magic of the seas to screens big and small. One afternoon not long ago, I looked a fish in the eye and saw something beautiful. Her small pupils revealed a deepening maze of tawny, glistening yellows. Her scales at first looked gray and matte, but when I moved in closer—and I me...