Just after 9 p.m. on a Sunday two years ago, with Hurricane Harvey’s flood waters filling her Houston home and more rain falling, Ajshay James climbed into a rescue boat, holding her daughter, Harper. A Houston Chronicle and NBC News investigation found that doctors trained to spot child abuse had in some instances overstated their ability to determine when a child had been harmed, triggering traumatic family separations. In response, some Texas lawmakers have begun calling for additional safeguards to protect families. Harper, not yet 2, had been in and out of hospitals her entire life. Born nearly four months early, she spent her first 16 weeks in an incubator, connected to a machine that pumped oxygen in and out of her still-developing lungs. Her skin was thin and fragile, like plastic wrap. Each time Harper’s breathing slowed dangerously in those early months, James cried and prayed as nurses rushed to revive her. When Harper finally left the hospital at five months, doctors sent her with a device to monitor her heart rate and breathing. After its alarm sounded a few weeks later, Harper underwent surgery at Texas Children’s, one of the nation’s top-ranked pediatric hospital...